fbpx
Treetops

National Greening Program

The National Greening Program is mass seedling plantings across Canada, where there is a need for reforestation or afforestation.


View our other active programs here:
Reforestation & Carbon Offsetting →

Help Green our Nation!

In addition to the restoration of forests and wildlife habitat, trees planted through the National Greening Program contribute to cleaner air, cleaner soil, and cleaner waterways. This carbon compensation program is a hands-off initiative for organizations that wish to have a larger impact by planting $5 seedlings across 5 Canadian regions.

Consider some of the following environmental initiatives for your company or organization:

Employee Recognition

Recognition of employee or company milestones

Client Appreciation, Staff Appreciation

Per client or per product sale

Incentives

Per email acquisition or survey participation

Corporate Social Responsibility

Help offset office printing, paper use, mileage and/or energy consumption per percentage of monthly, quarterly or annual sales

Our Planting Sites

British Columbia

Project #1

Project description: This urban restoration project led by the City of New Westminster will be implemented in four of the city’s most important habitat and recreational trail areas. Population growth in this urban setting has significantly altered the natural landscape, and the original old growth forests that once characterized this region are gone. This project will improve community participation, stewardship and education for ecological restoration, as well as increase Indigenous cultural recognition and interpretive information specific to the traditional uses of the newly installed trees and plants.

Environmental benefits: This project will improve overall ecological integrity, optimize resources and provide substantially more benefits for both wildlife and the community over the long‐term. A range of ecosystem services will be realized through this project, including enhancing forest ecosystem functioning, such as biomass production, pollination, seed dispersal, resistance to windstorms, fire regulation and mitigation, pest regulation of native and invading insects, and carbon sequestration.

Species planted: This project boasts one of the most diverse collection of native tree and shrub species in Tree Canada’s National Greening Program. Species include: Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga mensiezii), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), grand fir (Abies grandis), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), Douglas maple (Acer glabrum), bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), Pacific dogwood (Cornus nutallii), vine maple (Acer circinatum), beaked hazelnut (Corylus cornuta var. californica), red-osier dogwood (Cornus sericea), Sticky currant (Ribes viscosissimum), Saskatoon serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia), common snowberry (Symphcarpos albus), red huckleberry (Vaccinmium parvifolium), among others.

Landowner: City of New Westminster

British Columbia

Project #2

Project description: This project will plant approximately 20,000 trees to support the restoration of riparian areas along the Tranquil River and the Atleo River, a project which is also part of the Redd Fish Restoration Society’s larger multi-year program that aims to restore fish habitat in the region.

Environmental benefits: The trees planted will diversify and restore the native vegetation and increase long-term ecosystem stability. As part of a larger ecosystem restoration effort, the tree planting will benefit a wide range of wildlife, including endangered salmon, mammals and coastal bird species.

Species planted: Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), red cedar (Thuja plicata), balsam fir (Abies balsamea), alder (Alnus sp.), willow (Salix sp.)

Landowner: Island Natural Resource District – BC government

Prairies

Project description: This site is located at FortWhyte Alive in Winnipeg. FortWhyte Alive is a 660-acre reclaimed urban green space located on Treaty 1 Territory. FortWhyte Alive is situated on a reclaimed clay mine and cement factory.

Environmental benefits: FortWhyte Alive provides programming, natural settings, and facilities for environmental education and outdoor recreation. The planting at the educational centre will provide multiple benefits including shade, shelter, recreational benefits, wildlife habitat, soil retention, aesthetic beauty and clean air. FortWhyte Alive promotes awareness and understanding of the natural world and actions leading to sustainable living.

Species planted: acute willow (Salix acurfolia), balsam fir (Abies balsamea), Jack pine (Pinus banksiana), Manitoba maple (Acer negundo) and white spruce (Picea glauca)

Landowner: FortWhyte Alive

Ontario

Project #1

Project description: This unique project involves afforestation on a 38-acre Wolfe Island property within the Cataraqui Conservation network along the St. Lawrence River. This planting of 30,400 trees will create a forest in loving memory of the property owner’s late father.

Environmental benefits: Once established, the newly planted seedlings will offer habitat and shade for wildlife, reduce soil erosion, prevent flooding, and increase the overall tree canopy of the island.

Species planted: White pine (Pinus strobus), Norway spruce (Picea abies), tamarack (Larix laricina), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa)

Ontario

Project #2

Project description: This project will see the planting of 8000 trees within the Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority. This planting will help restore the site to natural forest conditions and enhance biodiversity on approximately 7.3 hectares.

Environmental benefits: This land, once used for farming, will be managed for ecological restoration, and will complement the Hay Swamp Provincially Significant Wetland. This forest restoration will enhance species diversity through the mass planting of a variety of tree species.

Species planted: White pine (Pinus strobus), red oak (Quercus rubra), white oak (Quercus alba), bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa), paper birch (Betula papyrifera), shagbark hickory (Carya ovata), tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), black cherry (Prunus serotina), tamarack (Larix laricina), silver maple (Acer saccharinum), white spruce (Picea glauca)

Landowner: Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority

Quebec

Project description: Located in the Lac-Saint-Jean region, this project will allow for the restoration of poorly regenerated parcels of municipal public land to forest production.

Located close to the urban environment, this forested area is used by different types of users including a sled dog club, outdoor enthusiasts, and hunters. Planting and restoring the site will improve the recreational potential of this sector.

Environmental benefits: The increase in forest production from poorly regenerated parcels will improve air quality and increase carbon sequestration in the region. This will also strongly contribute to the creation of wildlife habitats that will support a diversity of wildlife living in the area.

Species planted: Black spruce (Picea Mariana), Tamarack (Larix Laricina), Jack pine (Pinus banksiana)

Landowner: MRC du Domaine-du-Roy

Atlantic

Project description: Located on the Chignecto Isthmus, this 23-kilometre strip of land joins mainland Nova Scotia to New Brunswick and connects the rest of the continent. The isthmus is the only land corridor for the movement of plants and wildlife between the two provinces, however it is rapidly being fragmented by clearcutting, development, and transportation. The resilience of the Tantramar region is entirely tied to the ecological health of the isthmus making it a priority area for conservation initiatives.

Environmental benefits: Replanting clearcuts and protecting mature forest on the Chignecto Isthmus will have significant impacts on the region’s resilience to climate change. Trees that are traditionally planted in post-clearcut reforestation cannot adapt to a changing climate and cannot mature into healthy, diverse forest ecosystems that mitigate climate change, store carbon, and prevent flooding. While traditional conservation organizations prioritize ‘pristine’ mature woodlands, Community Forests International is targeting these ecosystems which have undergone massive land use change in the past and are ready for a resilient future.

Species planted: White pine (Pinus strobus), eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red spruce (Picea rubens), white spruce (Picea glauca), black spruce (Picea mariana), red oak (Quercus rubra), yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis), sugar maple (Acer saccharum)

Landowner: Community Forests International

British Columbia

Project description: This project will see over 50,000 trees planted to support the restoration of riparian areas along the Tranquil River and the Atleo River, as part of the Redd Fish Restoration Society’s larger multi-year programs that aim to restore fish habitat in the region.

Environmental benefits: The trees planted will diversify and restore the native vegetation and increase long-term ecosystem stability. As part of a larger ecosystem restoration effort, the tree planting will benefit a wide range of wildlife including endangered salmon, mammals and coastal bird species.

Species planted: Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), red cedar (Picea sitchensis), balsam fir (Abies balsamea), alder (Alnus sp.), willow (Salix sp.)

Landowner: South Island Natural Resource District – BC government

Prairies

Project description: This project will plant 140,000 white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings near the Rural Municipality of Stuartburn, Manitoba, with a goal to establish permanent tree cover on this fragile, deteriorated site that was grazed many years ago and will not naturally regenerate itself. A few years ago, a major windstorm uprooted trees and heavy rains caused soil erosion along the Roseau River. These trees will provide snow retention, shelter from winds, noise and dust reduction from vehicle traffic and recreational benefits for local residents.

Environmental benefits: This planting will provide food for wildlife, restore wildlife travel corridors, increase the aesthetic beauty of the area, allow carbon sequestration and clean air for all. The planting is environmentally important as the newly planted trees will provide watershed protection around the landfill/transfer station area and help remediate polluted soil, provide snow retention and improve water quality and watershed health by decreasing the amount of rainwater and floodwater runoff.

Species planted: White spruce (Picea glauca)

Landowner: Rural Municipality of Stuartburn

Ontario

Project description: Tree Canada has partnered with Conservation Sudbury and the municipality of Greater Sudbury to support the restoration of areas in and around Maley Conservation Area, which was impacted by historic logging and mining operations. This area was affected by early logging and mining activities that left the area devoid of vegetation, with some acidic and metal contamination, and soils that eroded away leaving many exposed bedrock areas. White/Paper Birch have repopulated in most areas but remains stunted and multi-stemmed in areas not treated with crushed agricultural limestone. For these reasons, the site is not regenerating on its own and needs human intervention to restore the ecosystem. In 2021, this Tree Canada project will increase the diversity of plants by planting native trees and shrubs.

Environmental benefits: The goal is to support the restoration of areas in and around the municipality impacted by historic logging and mining operations.

Species planted: Green alder (Alnus viridis ssp. Crispa), yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), red-twigged serviceberry (Amelanchier sanguinea), mountain maple (Acer spicatum), smooth serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis), running serviceberry (Amelanchier stolonifera), wild raisin (Viburnum cassinoides)

Landowner: Conservation Sudbury

Quebec

Project description: This project will see 20,000 seedlings planted on the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg Reserve. It will provide social, ecological, economical, and biological benefits. It will contribute to a healthier watershed in the region and will increase the sequestration of carbon dioxide supporting climate change mitigation. Restoration of this forest will eventually create habitat for wide variety of birds, amphibians, small mammals, deer and bears.

Environmental benefits: This planting will restore forest cover to increase species diversity, improve wildlife habitat, create wildlife corridors, improve soil stabilization and hydrological features of the area.

Species planted: Mixed hardwoods (red oak (Quercus rubra), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis), white pine (Pinus strobus)

Landowner: Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation

Atlantic

Project description: The site is located on the Chignecto Isthmus, the 23 kilometre strip of land joining mainland Nova Scotia to New Brunswick and the rest of the continent. The Isthmus is the only land corridor for the movement of plants and wildlife between the two provinces, however it is rapidly being fragmented by clearcutting, development, and transportation. The resilience of the Tantramar region is entirely tied to the ecological health of the isthmus, which is now highly endangered. This has made it a priority area for conservation initiatives.

Environmental benefits: Replanting clearcuts and protecting mature forest on the Chignecto Isthmus will have significant impacts on the region’s resilience to climate change. Trees that are traditionally planted in post-clearcut reforestation cannot adapt to a changing climate and cannot mature into healthy, diverse forest ecosystems that mitigate climate change, store carbon, and prevent flooding. While traditional conservation organizations prioritize ‘pristine’ mature woodlands, Community Forests International is targeting these ecosystems which have undergone massive land use change in the past and are ready for a resilient future.

Species planted: White pine (Pinus strobus), eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red spruce (Picea rubens), white spruce (Picea glauca), red oak (Quercus rubra), yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis), sugar maple (Acer saccharum)

Landowner: Community Forests International

Past Planting Sites and Survival Rates

For planting contractors:

We are always looking for potential tree planting contractors to express their interest in carrying out tree planting projects for our National Greening Program.

It is preferred that a single organization take on an entire tree-planting project. When new funding opportunities become available, all submitted projects will be considered.

Successful projects will be rewarded based on the proposal criteria detailed in the Request for Proposals.

For Landowners:

Tree Canada encourages Canadian property owners to submit a proposal to be part of our National Greening Program, which aims to support landowners in their tree planting project where there is a need for forest rehabilitation, afforestation or ecosystem restoration.

What properties are eligible?

Eligible properties include:

  • areas formerly used for crop rotation,
  • meadows, grasslands and riparian areas,
  • woodlands that could use enhancement.

Plant-able area must be a minimum of 4 hectares or greater (10 acres).

Non-eligible properties include:

  • areas which are currently under a forest tenure license for future commercial wood harvest,
  • sites in which reforestation is mandated under provincial legislation following disturbance and/or resource extraction,
  • wetlands and permanently flooded sites, sites with active crop rotation, and
  • sites that are frequented by livestock.

There are exceptions to these eligibility criteria. For questions concerning eligibility and application support, please contact the National Greening Program manager.

Canada, BC, Vancouver. Tree Canada event, Everett Crowley Park

Start Greening Today!

Help us grow better places to live